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POST NATAL RECOVERY - RECIPES

February 18, 2019

 

In Chinese culture it is recommended that in the "Golden Month" a mother is to rest for a month at home, to keep warm, and eat well. A visit to your acupuncturist will also contribute to your recovery post-natally. Your acupuncturist will warm all the energy points opened during the process of giving birth and assist in regaining qi and blood.

Below are some recipes to try out during your month at home. Have relatives, mothers, mothers'-in-law help with the cooking.

 

JANET'S NYONYA WOK Post Natal Cuisine (serves 4)

 

Lemongrass and ginger Rice

Ingredients:

Finely chop 1/2 onion, 3 cloves of garlic,

3cm ginger, 2 stalks of lemongrass, 

50gm butter 1/2 tablesppon chicken stock powder

salt to taste

water and  4 cups of rice.

Method

Wash rice until water runs clear

Mix in all the above ingredients with rice

Add water roughly 3-4 cups of water.

Cook until the rice absorbs all the water.

You may want to use a rice cooker which will switch off when all the water has been absorbed.

 

VITAL VEGETABLE BROTH 

This broth may be used as stock or taken hot or cold, Many people report more energy, better sleep, and experiencing soothing of their nervous system when consumed daily.

 

(Where possible use organic vegetables)                         1 BayLeaf

2 medium yellow onions                                               4 cloves of garlic

4 leeks most of the green tops removed                            12 black peppercorns

7 carrots 7 stalks of celery                                              4 whole allspice

4 red potatoes                                                               1 tablespoon sea salt

2 sweet potatoes 12 greeen string beans

1/2 bunch of flat leaf parsely

wash and chop vegetables without peeling including the skin on garlic and onions.

Place all the ingredients in a large pan . Fill the pan with filtered water to cover the vegetables and to just a few inches below the top of the pan. Cover and simmer for at least 2 hours. Let the mixture cool enough to handle strain and store in jars or drink.

(from "Wholefood Nutrition"

 

CONGEES

 

A congee is a type of Porridge commonly made with rice or barley. In China millet or buckwheat is sometimes used. It is often eaten for breakfast. The ratio is generally 1/2 cup of grains to 8 cups of liquid., the proportions may be altered according to whether you want a thick consistency or a more soup like consistency. The congee is simmered for one to 2 hours and served with garnishes such as scallions, spring onions, pickles and salted duck eggs.. Congee is often served to invalids and people convalescing, boosting energy and because it is easy to digest.  Nutritious ingredients may be added..as medicine. I grew up in a household with the idea that food was medicine, and had energy, typically hot or cold. Below are some suggested combinations of ingredients;

 

Chinese red dates, black dates, and a litle cinnammon for a sweet and warming qi and blood tonifying congee.

 

Fresh shitake mushrooms cooked with a little garlic and topping with freshly chopped spring onions  for warming saoury qi and blood tonifying congee

 

For a blood-buildng congee grind 25gms of black sesame seeds and add to the uncooked rice, cook as a normal congee, 

 

Cook slices of chicken chicken and ginger in a rice congee replacing the water with chicken stock and topping with spring onion

 

Chicken Qi and Blood Buildng Recipes   from Lee Yueh-O

 

Chicken Casserole

600ml bottle of rice wine, 5 medium slices fresh ginger,

8 fresh chicken pieces, 2 tablespoons back sesame oil

Heat pan and add sesame oil. Add ginger and briefly stir fry. Add chicken and cook until golden brown before adding rice wine, Bring to the boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20-40 minutes.

 

Chicken Soup

One medium chicken,

5-6 mussels,

3litres of water

Bring water to the boil,add chicken and mussels and simmer for 3 hours. Cool strain any impurities that are on the surface, reheat and eat as soup.

 

compiled by Debra Betts author of "The Essential guide to Acupuncture in Pregnancy and Childbirth 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

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